thelandofmaps:

[OC] My map project: Every ethno-linguistic group gets a nation! based primarily on language-speaker distribution but also has quite a bit of irredentism and historical revision(ie certain extinct groups coming back to life) thrown in. Obviously not comple
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

generalelectric:

In the 1960s, GE engineers developed the Cybernetic Anthropmorophous Machine, or Walking Truck. In 1966, the US Army awarded GE a contract for building the experimental vehicle. However, its hand and foot controls not only fatigued operators, but were impractical for prolonged use on the battlefield, so the project was discontinued. Kevin Weir at flux machine recently reanimated the Walking Truck so the mechanical beast could gallop once more.

generalelectric:

In the 1960s, GE engineers developed the Cybernetic Anthropmorophous Machine, or Walking Truck. In 1966, the US Army awarded GE a contract for building the experimental vehicle. However, its hand and foot controls not only fatigued operators, but were impractical for prolonged use on the battlefield, so the project was discontinued. Kevin Weir at flux machine recently reanimated the Walking Truck so the mechanical beast could gallop once more.

bbsrc:

Have a happy Easter, full of happy eggs

It is probably not uppermost in your mind when you dye eggs for Easter that you are depending on an invisible structure called the cuticle being present for the eggs to colour properly. But the amount of change in colour you see depends on how much cuticle is present on the egg.

Having colourful Easter eggs is good news, but more importantly this same cuticle prevents bacteria entering the egg. This reduces the chance of bacteria reaching the developing chick if the egg is fertile and keeps the non-fertile eggs we eat safe.

Industry and BBSRC-funded scientist are developing tools which are better, although less colourful, to measure the amount of cuticle on an egg. This will allow genetic selection to improve the cuticle and improve egg safety. 

Research from: The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, University of Glasgow, Lohmann Tierzucht and Aviagen

Image of the green eggs from Norrie Russell.

Images of the bowl of dyed eggs from Hannah Dunn.

(via science-junkie)